Depression in menopause

Tears were streaming down my cheek. My husband desperately tries to get an answer out between my hickups. I see his doubt and then his understanding: “Hormones again? ” . Up to now the peri-menopause was a breeze. Maybe I’m still at the beginning, but my night sweats are bearable. My weight is still under control. My breathing exercises help me with my palpitations. Physically I really can’t complain. Mentally though. A completely different story. The dark clouds hanging over my head, every time right before my period, those are less easy to deal with.

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Anything is possible in menopause

“Tell me, what can I do for you?”. My GP looks at me expectantly. Again. Since I passed 50, I’ve seen her more times than in the 20 years before. If not for periods that never end, it is for infections that keep flaring up, breasts that are killing me with pain or cramping that can’t  be averted with a overdose of Feminax.  This time my reason to visit is that my period isn’t coming at all.  For once I am glad: could it be that I’m finally released of this monthly returning flood. I wouldn’t mind that all!

No reason to be shy about it: Anything is possible when it comes to menopause. 

It’s just, my body doesn’t seem to get it and won’t agree with my ovaries.  Continue reading

Short fuse

“Let’s just say, this is the last thing I expected. ” My doctor watches me with an understanding look on her face: “Indeed, you tend to think about hot flashes, mood swings or a short fuse. And the skipping of periods. But not this. Still, it is all part of that final stretch into menopause.”  “Well,” I try to joke, “that short fuse is getting shorter by the day, let me tell you.” She probably understands my need to keep the conversation light, to prevent the tears from falling, but that doesn’t stop her from warning me: “Don’t forget: if the situation doesn’t change in two weeks time, we have to take other steps! Keep me updated and I expect to see you in two weeks.” Continue reading